More people than ever before are shifting their opinions about Cannabis and choosing CBD to provide natural relief for their medical conditions. Whether you’ve never tried CBD, tried it once or twice, or are an active user, our helpful guide is a great resource to learn more or share with a friend. Now we all know, when trying anything new, there’s always a learning curve, and with CBD, it’s no different. For new users, understanding what it is and, more importantly, how it works can be a little confusing. If that seems to be the situation you’re in now, don’t worry. Our CBD Guide will answer most of your questions and get you on the right track.

The Basics

CBD (Cannabidiol) is a compound found in the Cannabis plant. It can be used in several different ways including vaping, tinctures, capsules, and edibles. Unlike its close relative, THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD is completely non-psychoactive. This allows us to benefit from the many health properties of the cannabis plant without the negative side effects of “getting high.” Because of this, CBD became a very popular option for those seeking a natural alternative to treat conditions such as chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, PTSD, epilepsy and other mental disorders. CBD inherits many of the medicinal properties of cannabis such as being anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiolytic. This allows it to provide natural stress, anxiety and pain relief. This alone isn’t what allows CBD to benefit so many conditions. What allows it to effectively treat so many conditions and maintain health and wellness in the body is how the cannabinoids found in CBD interact with receptors throughout our endocannabinoid system.

CBD vs THC: Which One Works Best

Cannabidiol and THC (also called "The High Causer") are the power couple of cannabis therapeutics; they work best together. CBD and THC interact synergistically to potentiate each other’s curative qualities. CBD enhances THC’s painkilling and anticancer properties, while lessening THC’s psychoactivity. CBD can also mitigate adverse effects caused by too much THC, such as anxiety and rapid heartbeat. When both compounds are present in sufficient amounts in the same cannabis strain or product, CBD will lower the ceiling on the THC high while prolonging its duration. (“Relaxing but not intoxicating” is how one patient described CBD-rich cannabis.) CBD broadens the range of conditions treatable with cannabis, such as liver, cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, which may be less responsive to THC-dominant remedies. CBD and THC both stimulate neurogenesis, the creation of new brain cells, in adult mammals.

What Is the Optimal Dosage of CBD for a Person?

An effective dosage can range from as little as a few milligrams of CBD-enriched cannabis oil to a gram or more. Begin with a small dose of high CBD/low THC oil, especially if you have little or no experience with cannabis. Take a few small doses over the course of the day rather than one big dose. Use the same dose and ratio for several days. Observe the effects and if necessary, adjust the ratio or amount. Don’t overdo it. Cannabis compounds have biphasic properties, which means that low and high doses of the same substance can produce opposite effects. Small doses of cannabis tend to stimulate; large doses sedate. Too much THC, while not lethal, can amplify anxiety and mood disorders. CBD has no known adverse side effects, but an excessive amount of CBD could be less effective therapeutically than a moderate dose. “Less is more” is often the case with respect to cannabis therapy.

Is There a Difference between Hemp-Derived CBD and Cannabis-Derived CBD?

If you live in a state where medical marijuana is legal and available, look for CBD products made from high-resin cannabis (rather than low-resin industrial hemp) that are sold in medical marijuana dispensaries. Unregulated hemp-derived CBD-infused products of varying quality are also available via dozens of internet storefronts. Many of these products are mislabeled. Compared to whole plant CBD-rich cannabis, industrial hemp grown for fiber or seed is typically low in cannabinoid content. A huge amount of fiber hemp is required to extract a small amount of CBD. This raises the risk of contaminants because hemp, a bio-accumulator, draws toxins from the soil. That’s a great feature for restoring a poisoned ecosystem, but it’s not recommended for extracting medicinal oil. Heavily refined CBD paste, or terpene-free CBD isolate crystal is poor starter material for formulating CBD-rich oil products. The debate over sourcing CBD from cannabis rather than hemp will soon be moot as plant breeders succeed in developing high-resin CBD-rich cannabis varietals with less than 0.3% THC, the arbitrarily designated legal limit for hemp.

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